All nests of paper wasps must be destroyed.

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  • #14689

    clinton9
    Participant

    Hi members,

    Due to La Nina summertime, the numbers of paper wasps had increased through last 5 months and this month the nests had reached 13c.m-15c.m. across, with many mouths of larvaes (are future queen wasps that will hunt for caterpillars this springtime) female wasps are hunting to feed larvaes.

    That’s time we must DESTROY the nests this autumntime, to give our butterfly caterpillars their chance to become butterflies before winter set in.

    Once we had destroyed all nests, we will enjoy see plently of butterflies & caterpillars this springtime.

    This wintertime will be normal winter, with some frosts to come. Low temperature kills weak / unhealthy butterflies.

    If we cannot destroy nests, there will be very few butterflies & caterpillars by springtime.

    Butterflies appreciate our help in battle with paper wasps.

    You need gloves and plastic bags to collect nests, but be careful not to get stung.

    To find the nests is follow the wasps in flight.

    Either freeze the nests in freezer for few weeks or stamp / trample the nests.

    Cheers

    Clinton.

Viewing 11 replies - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #26567

    Darren
    Participant

    Clinton the Australian Grapevine Moth (Phalaenoides glycinae Lewin, 1805) is an invasive pest, first recorded here by Wise in 1956. It would be great if it was totally eradicated here but I doubt that is true. It is still being monitored. see
    http://www.fruitfed.co.nz/Divisions/Crop_Monitoring_Services/pest.aspx

    If you do find any of its caterpillars please do not raise them!

    I been researched about Asian paper wasps in NZ, and found they cannot be eradicated in northern North Island where wasps are common.

    Quite so. Now wouldn’t it have been better to do that research before making your ill-advised announcements on this subject?

    #26562

    clinton9
    Participant

    Terry & Darren,
    I been researched about Asian paper wasps in NZ, and found they cannot be eradicated in northern North Island where wasps are common.
    Unlike Common & Germany wasps the Asian paper wasps cannot be poisoned / trapped as they do not eat meats / dead fish.
    Nests of paper wasps can be destroyed, but not all nests can be easy to find, I found nests hidden in a small tree and long grasses. February to April is best months for destroying the nests as nests will had crop of new queen wasps as larvaes.
    Seems there is nothing MAF can do to eradicate these wasps in North Island, because of some nests being hidden & not being found in bushes / trees / grasses, this leads wasps to return to empty areas where wasps were destroyed.

    Only way to keep native butterflies alive:

    1) Build caterpillar-rearing cages for rearing butterfly caterpillars.

    2) Plant plently of foodplants for butterfly caterpillars in gardens.

    3) Plant the butterfly bushes 7 flowering plants for feeding butterflies.
    Well fed butterfly produce more eggs than poorly fed butterfly.

    Cheers

    Clinton.

    #26561

    Terry
    Participant

    Hi Darren & Terry,
    If left to Mother Nature, the numbers of Asian paper wasps will increase in South Island.
    This is a very big shock for 1-3 year-old caterpillars of native mountain ringlet butterflies & Tussock butterflies.
    These native butterflies and their caterpillars did not know about paper wasps, for past million years.

    Clinton, If you leave it to mother nature or kill as many wasps as you can, Mother nature will win by adapting to the changes The wasps have established already. The best thing you can do is offer some protection from the wasps by captive rearing of larvae of the Admirals and other methods mentioned on this forum.

    Quote from Darren,

    I don’t like Asian paper wasps myself, and I kill plenty. But it doesn’t matter whether they arrived on a boat 30 years ago, floated here on driftwood thousands of years ago, or evolved here millions of years ago, the fact is they are here now and there is bugger all we can do about it.

    Clinton, please read what Darren said again carefully! We are not saying you should not kill the wasps just that you won’t eradicate them or make any difference they are too well established now!

    I hope you also realise that the reason you may not see Red Admirals around the farm you work at could be down to a combination of factors, The amount of foodplant (Nettles) in the area could have dropped due to farming practices, spraying herbicides, Urtica Ferox being destroyed in the local bush. housing development and many other possible reasons. The paper wasps will have an impact but will not be totally responsible, Just look at the difference many members of Monarch Trust have had on increasing the local Admiral populations by planting nettles in their own gardens or getting local authorities to stop destroying nettles in local parks and reserves. It’s always a combination of things that make a difference not just one species such as the Paper Wasp.

    #26560

    Darren
    Participant

    What is Harlequin ladybird ???

    This website might help you. It is called google.

    http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=Harlequin+ladybird

    #26559

    clinton9
    Participant

    Asian wasps are very common in Auckland to Hamilton and these insects are still confined to north end of South Island, but spreading southward. They are spreading northward toward Kaitaia and southward toward Wellington.

    White & black pattened caterpillars of Grapevine moth had disappeared 15 years ago. Grapevine moths come from Australia.
    When I were a schoolboy I reared few caterpillars of grapevine moth, but now they are extinct, thanks to Asian paper wasps.

    I looked for caterpillars of hawk moth in Thames wasteland for 10 past years, but I did not find them.
    I never caught hawk moths and find their caterpillars in NZ all my life.

    Asian paper wasps are not really confined to gardens, I had seen them in bush, beaches, wastelands.

    Cheers

    Clinton.

    #26558

    clinton9
    Participant

    Hi Darren & Terry,
    If left to mother nature, the numbers of Asian paper wasps will increase in South Island.
    This is a very big shock for 1-3 year-old caterpillars of native mountain ringlet butterflies & Tussock butterflies.
    These native butterflies and their caterpillars did not know about paper wasps, for past million years.

    When paper wasps become more common in South Island, they go up to tussocks and find tussock butterfly caterpillars much easier prey, because they did not know how to defend themselves against wasps.
    Australian paper wasps are of no importance to me as they are much less harmful than Asian paper wasps and their numbers are lower. But now Australian paper wasps are displaced by Asian paper wasps. I don’t destroy nests of Australian paper wasps.

    Look at what happened to our Forest Ringlet butterflies and Red Admiral butterflies-both native butterflies.

    That is up to us humen to either remove the Asian paper wasps or let mother nature look after wasps.
    If we let mother nature to look after wasps & b/flies, we risk loose these native butterflies through extinctions.

    We know how to look after & breed Red Admiral butterflies & Forest Ringlet b/flies in big butterfly houses, but we do not know how to look after & breed tussock b/flies and Mountain Ringlet butterflies in butterfly houses.
    Caterpillars of these ringlet & tussock b/flies take 1-3 years from eggs to new young b/flies.
    MAF had not bring the parasitic wasps to NZ to control Asian paper wasps yet. MAF had be careful not to bring in wrong parasitic insects.
    I had seen Asian paper wasps in native bush.
    I had not seen Red Admiral butterflies in Thames and at farm whose I working, since 2007.

    Terry,
    What is Harlequin ladybird ???

    Beside Asian paper wasps, there are African mantises in North Island, but they are in lower numbers than Asian Paper wasps in a garden and I do not brother to kill these African mantises because they eats pest insects.

    Cheers

    Clinton.

    #26557

    Darren
    Participant

    Also the nuisance value of the wasps varies with the season. In spring and summer they hunt for a lot of protein for the queen’s egglaying. This is when they attack caterpillars, chrysalises and butterflies.
    (eg https://www.monarch.org.nz/2011/03/01/monarch-chrysalis-attacked-by-asian-paper-wasp)

    However in the autumn their diet changes, and they take more nectar as they build up their food stores for the winter.
    (eg https://www.monarch.org.nz/2011/03/01/asian-paper-wasp-taking-nectar-from-a-curassavica)

    Big bugs have little bugs
    On their backs to bite ’em.
    Little bugs have littler bugs
    And so on, ad infinitum!

    #26553

    Darren
    Participant

    In any ecosystem where there is a niche with a food supply then something will either evolve to exploit that niche or move in from elsewhere. New Zealand has an estimated 2,000?3,000 species of wasps and bees, most of which are native.

    Four non-native social wasp species have become established here and are regarded as pests. Australian paper wasps (Polistes humilis) were abundant in Northland in the 1880’s. German wasps (Vespula germanica) arrived at the end of World War 2 and common wasps (Vespula vulgaris) became established in the 1970’s. The Asian paper wasp (Polistes chinensis) was first found near Auckland in 1979.

    As Terry says feel free to kill them if it makes you feel any better, but you won’t make much of a dent in their population. And the sort of mass-spraying type campaigns that might be effective when there are still only a few pests in a small area are not popular with the public.

    I don’t like Asian paper wasps myself, and I kill plenty. But it doesn’t matter whether they arrived on a boat 30 years ago, floated here on driftwood thousands of years ago, or evolved here millions of years ago, the fact is they are here now and there is bugger all we can do about it.

    Butterflies appreciate our help in battle with paper wasps.

    Really? Who told them?

    #26549

    Terry
    Participant

    Hi Clinton
    Go ahead and kill as many as you want but if MAF could not get rid of them you certainly won’t no matter how many you kill. If they have multiplied and spread all the way to the South Island then accept the fact they are now firmly established, just like we accept Harlequin ladybirds are now in the in the UK, even though we would rather they were not!
    I am pretty sure other members of this forum understand what I am trying to teach you. You won’t eradicate them now and if you reduce the numbers in your area this year they will be back again by next year be assured of that fact!
    And just for the record Paper wasps are not cunning! They act purely on instinct; they are after all just insects!

    #26548

    clinton9
    Participant

    Terry,
    This apply to Asian paper wasps only that are not native to NZ and were brought to NZ on 1970s.

    MAF in NZ tried to get rid of all Asian paper wasps, but wasps are cunning & multiplied & spread down to South Island.

    Up to us people to take action on wasps.

    Cheers

    Clinton.

    #26545

    Terry
    Participant

    Clinton,
    If you spent from now until this time next year doing nothing but killing all the Paper wasps and nests in your area, the effect you will have will be negligible. Do you have any idea how many wasps there are in all of “Auckland” or the “bay of Islands” area for example? If you did you would not set yourself such an impossible task.
    I think you need to stop and think seriously before wasting your time on this sort of project. Even if all 4 million New Zealanders turned out to help for just one day you would not make that much of an impact. You would be surprised how quickly the wasps would repopulate the areas cleared. That?s why they are so successful in the first place; they multiply very quickly and would re-colonize even quicker because of all the extra food that would be available in the areas where you controlled them. Nature abhors a vacuum and soon fills it. Best to listen to what Norm has said and protect your larvae with nets rather than a full scale pointless war with the wasps.

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