Asclepias incarnata, swamp milkweed seeds

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  • #60994

    Jacqui
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    Ideal for cooler climates: frosts, snow. The first one to produce leaves (from its rhizome), well before swan plants are available for sale or appear self-sown in the home garden. Swamp milkweed also spreads through rhizomes (roots that grow horizontally from the original plant).

    Easily grown in moist to wet soils in full sun, this milkweed will thrive in average garden soil, as well. The plant grows about 1 metre tall and forms a stately clump with upright stems, long narrow leaves and clusters of fragrant pink flowers – followed by attractive seed pods for late season interest.

    Sowing: In late autumn, direct sow the swamp milkweed seedsjust below the surface. Germination will take place in the spring, after the last frost. When the seedlings appear, thin to the strongest plant; seedlings usually do not survive transplanting, since they resent any disturbance of their roots.

    For spring planting, mix the seeds with moist sand and refrigerate for 30 days before direct sowing.

    Growing: Since this plant does not tolerate drought, watering may be necessary to keep the soil moist. The flowers attract bees and many butterflies. Because competing weeds will damage the growth of this plant, keep them down to a minimum.

    https://plants.usda.gov/factsheet/pdf/fs_asin.pdf

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  • #61074

    milkweed
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    Jacqui, you are so right about A.incarnata or Swamp milkweed being well suited to NZ’s climate. I honestly think its much more useful for cooler parts of NZ compared to A.curassaviva (tropical milkweed) as it pops up again year after year without the need for resowing each season. Another bonus is it gets progressively bigger each season that it pops up from the soil line AND the rootstock can be divided to form new plants! They can be easily transplanted when they are dormant in the winter too.
    If only this milkweed variety was more widely available around NZ garden centres and as seed from the bigger seed companies!

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