Emporer moth pupa issues?

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #60785

    SushiKando
    Participant

    So i got some british emporor moths around 27 days ago (this is my first time looking after them so i bought them, i did not rear the caterpillars or see them turn into a cocoon), they are a species that overwinters so i expect them to take a little longer to emerge. They were originally in cocoons but i have a little section cut so that i can do checks to see if they are alive and such. They are in a netted cage so nothing can get in but i started noticing some issues with on of mine. The back of this pupa started to look kind of wrinkled in one spot and there was some lighter discolouration near that (near the top of the head, the pupae are usually very dark). I checked on it this morning and it looked like that discolouration had spread. I did a check and slightly bended the abdomen to see if it would return back in place and it did but just not to the extent it normally would. It also feels a lot softer than before. Im sure this one is dead but i keeping it in a secluded area from the other 3 just in case. It has not gone completely dark like it would if it was definetely dead by the looks of things

    I read on another site about moths that depending on the habitat, some can dry out and die and that a solution to this is to mist the area they are in. These guys are usually in heathlands which can be both dry or wet so i guessed that it would be good to try just in case they were getting too dry. Im not completely sure if this is what the cause of my problems are because the room they are in is not warm but not cold either. Im guessing that I may have overdone the misting somehow and that the pupa that is discoloured may have fungus growth

    What im looking to get answered is if my theory would be correct that that is the cause of discolouration and if i should even be misting this species of moth pupa anyways. I couldn’t find any info in other places, and the info i did find often directly contradicted the info from another site so this is my last resort
    Thank you to anyone who helps

Viewing 2 replies - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #60830

    SushiKando
    Participant

    Big suprise! The one i assumed to be dead just emerged ^^ that along with a male so hopefully we can get some eggs

    #60786

    Antherina
    Participant

    I am assuming this is in the northern hemisphere? If the pupae are still flexible they haven’t dried out. Too much moisture can be as detrimental as too little. In Scotland I kept my cocoons as near to outside temperatures as possible to avoid them emerging too soon. Garden sheds, where there is more humidity than inside the house, would mean there would be no need for misting. If you mist, ensure the cocoons are allowed to dry out naturally before doing it again. In the wild the cocoons would be attached to their food plant with plenty of air circulating round the them. You can hang them up so when the moth emerges they can hang free to expand their wings. If they are placed on, say, paper towel, ensure there are twigs or netting sides for the moth to climb. Living pupae often wriggle, but its abdomen returning to its original position is a hopeful sign. Google WWB.co.uk for more information. Good luck.

Viewing 2 replies - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.