Great photographs

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  • #21732

    Lepidopteranos
    Participant

    OK. Here’s a fairly good photo of a caterpillar
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lepidopteranos/3868856789/

    I am adding new photos nearly every day so keep an eye on http://www.flickr.com/photos/lepidopteranos/

    #21721

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Awesome!

    #21719

    Lepidopteranos
    Participant

    How about this photo of an admiral’s head?
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lepidopteranos/3868829259/

    #21695

    Lepidopteranos
    Participant

    A lot of it is technique and experience and spending an awful lot of time taking heaps of pictures so that just a few might be really good. The kind of equipment helps a lot. For example I know that being able to see the focus on a dSLR which has through the lens viewing and direct manual focus would make some levels of photography a lot quicker and easier e,g, closeups or macro.

    On the other hand you can take photos a bit further away in good outdoor lighting conditions with an ultrazoom lens and crop them if the camera has plenty of megapixels. I’m expecting to get a lot more photos this summer and there might be just a few that are really good.

    #21689

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/nature-wildlife/175337-butterflies.html

    I just love looking at these close-ups of butterflies.

    #21675

    Lepidopteranos
    Participant

    Nikon D80 is a basic dSLR.

    Pretty good to be able to get photos of things in midair.

    #21674

    Jacqui
    Moderator
    #21668

    Lepidopteranos
    Participant

    Not as impressive as you might have thought when looked at close up, there is blurring in a couple of shots.

    This is my favourite admiral photo:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lepidopteranos/3802947831/in/set-72157621911940444/

    It is a crop from a larger picture which is here
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lepidopteranos/3777172903/in/set-72157621911940444/

    The camera I took these photos with is a ultrazoom point and shoot, granted it would have cost $700 in the shops at the time (I paid considerably less). Many of the photos in my albums were taken with cameras retailing around $200. At the moment the one I use the most retails about $400. You will notice a difference between a $200 camera and a $700 camera.

    You will also see difference with an $1100 dSLR. However the camera that was used to take these photos at Steves Digicams costs around $2500 in New Zealand. The lens he used could cost another $1500 and another piece that he mentions could cost another $800. The software used to process on his PC could cost $500 and the flash that was attached to his camera cost $800. The simple answer to that is that I will never justify spending $6000 on a camera, unless you are a pro who needs it for business, no way, it’s unbelievable the amount of money people will spend on status symbols.

    So all you need is maybe a $600 camera and it is mostly technique, a lot of patience and a lot of duds. I get most of my pictures off a buddleia bush just outside my office. I spend maybe up to an hour every day photographing butterflies. Take a few hundred pictures and at least some of them will turn out good.

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