Lime for Swan plants?

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  • #13318

    Swansong
    Participant

    Just curious. My plot where mine are planted is AS SOUR AS…ie buttercup, sorrell and various other little nasties like moss, albeit they are all weeded out at this point. Swannies seem to be doing well enough though, but Im wondering if they would be doing better with lime? SO which camp are swanplants in. Acid or alkaline or inbetween ? I believe its measured in the ph level?

    Id be grateful for any insight.

    Cheers

    Swansong

Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • #18906

    Swansong
    Participant

    OK so I’ve “dug into the system” and after some minor tweaking Ive got a work-around of sorts which suits me just fine. As such I now have the download on the aphids.

    Swansong

    #18900

    Swansong
    Participant

    Thanks Jacqui heaps for your research on this. Much appreciated for your info! Im sure theres a wee gadget (hopefully not too expensive) one can get to test the pH level right?

    Thanks flutterbys for sharing your FF experiences. : ). In troubleshooting mode it sometimes is a great help to be able ” compare notes” and help the good ol “process of elimination” strategy. BB wont make a difference as far as the glitches go, only the download time, as youd expect. Really I like to run FF coz it is a whole lot more secure than IE but its not been without problems and Ive just tended to put up with it, but its starting to wear VERY thin about these (p)retty (d)urned (f)rustrating pdfs.

    Chairs
    Swansong

    #18895

    Charlotte
    Participant

    Hi Swansong,

    Just a thought I usually open my links in another window. I downloaded the link above no probs. However we are on broadband. Hope it gets better for you Swansong.

    Charlotte

    #18894

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    More feedback on the lime situation: A commercial grower of both species of Gomphocarpus advises: “They do well in a wide range, neutral to slightly acidic is preferable.”

    Jacqui

    #18893

    Swansong
    Participant

    “Hi, do not panic.”

    Nope no panicking here, just a little confused Jacqui as we all know simultaneous posts are a fact of internet life 🙂 only this was just a little more weird than usual. Thats all.

    OK, I got it to download and it took aaaages, too long for a file that size, so it looks like its inconsistent at best for me Im afraid. Furthermore I wasnt sure whether it was locked up or not as my “scriptsblocked” icon was still showing even though I had enabled them. I was just about to kick it in the slats when it all appeared on the screen. Typically pdf style. : .

    It’s not a problem of pdf size, or content that affects the size, like graphics, thats causing the glitchiness. On dial-up, Ive downloaded plenty of HUGE (eg, one over 18 MBs another over 9MBs) pdfs full of coloured graphics and they can behave differently depending on the website, but this website seems to be giving me the most grief for some reason. That others have complained about pdfs in general, like taking over their browser by making things glitchy and/or lock up, is the reason Ive never bothered to look into it further and just taken it as another fact of internet life.

    Cheers
    Swansong

    #18892

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Hi, do not panic. Yes I had gone back in to edit mine, while you were composing yours.

    PDF is here:

    https://www.monarch.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/files/pH%20for%20Milkweed%20species.pdf

    It’s a very simple sheet, just text, so should not be a problem to download.

    Cheers

    Jacqui

    #18891

    Swansong
    Participant

    What the…. ??? am I hallucinating or did you just extend your post Jacqui… weird…I just hit the send tab on mine and I see your post now has some additional stuff and has come in B4 mine but was timed at about 34 odd minutes ago (at the time I posted )!!!

    Swansong

    #18890

    Swansong
    Participant

    Hey great. Burnt-orange your post is very helpful thanks… all the tips about the soil etc AND the lime usage. The swanplants are “neighbouring” my raised (about a foot) vege garden. The swannies are at ground level, but the drainage is still pretty good. It can get very wet but drains away quickly. The vege garden is on the swanplants northern aspect and therefore midwinter the soil doesnt see too much sun, when its at such a low angle. The soil structure isnt bad, but heavy when wet and certainly could do with loosening up. My mum has talked about gypsum so Im gunna ask her tomorrow. Obviously I cant do much about digging in stuff at this time, but will settle for the longer term strategy of composting the top and letting the worms do the work. Ive just applied a covering of lawn clippings which Ive used for years and years for all sorts of things… with the caveat of course, of not putting the clippings too deep and close to the stems or it can cause rot/burn depending on the plant.

    Thanks Jacqui. Shall go and see if I can download now, but I havent got any answers yet about my previous queries about my pdf issues. Flutterbys said she at times get lock ups on pdfs too and I know Ive heard of others. I really dont like Internet Exploder but I’ll try it as a last ditch effort if I have to.

    Swansong

    #18889

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Hello Swansong

    When I saw your post, it reminded me that it was something that I was going to research some time ago, so I’ve been doing a bit of homework on the subject on the internet. I will upload a pdf and HOPE that you can download it.

    I have uploaded it as “pH in soil to grow milkweed”.

    Basically, I did a google search on Asclepias species and then Gomphocarpus species, together with “pH”. Then I weeded through al the Ph D’s etc (ugh) and made a few notes about the different varieties and recommendations. It wasn’t easy, because we’re the only country that doesn’t think swan plant is a weed! Who wants to know how to grow weeds. 🙂

    Great post from Burnt Orange above (she/he posted it while I was doing my research and posting this). Anyway, try downloading the pdf and see if that helps. Explanation:

    There were quite a few species which we don’t have here, but all were between 5.4 and 8.0, which would suggest that the plants range from acidic to neutral. Which coincides with Burnt Orange’s post.

    Some of those websites are interesting to look at – especially Dave’s Garden, and a thread I found where I was discussing this very thing way back in 2005 in MonarchWatch.

    Cheers

    Jacqui

    #18888

    burnt-orange
    Participant

    Hi Swansong

    Just been looking through an old Palmer’s gardening manual, It appears average soil conditions with good drainage, I would look to creating a soil with a pH of around 6.0 – 6.5 being an average slightly acidic soil, adding lime would of course change your pH , but I would say drainage is the main issue with these plants.

    I would add – GYPSUM and a good quality organic compost, very lightly work in the gypsum being very careful of any surface roots , you can use up to 1 Kg per Sq metre , this will help with drainage over time and add available calcium , but is pH neutral.

    The compost will give you a good mulch and the worms will pull it through and create humus overtime , Ive found this to be a good starting point to improving soil structure , drainage and texture with soils as a whole.

    Oh, adding a little lime in late autumn/winter , One Kg per Sq metre changes pH by 1 point , if I remember right. I would just give it a light dressing once a year. And keep an eye on it and see what happens.

    hope this is of some use.

    All the best
    Burnt-orange

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