Monarch Butterflies on TV3 news tonight (wasps)

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  • #41379

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    5 January 2014.

Viewing 9 replies - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #41447

    Jaine
    Participant

    Thank you Norm for taking the time to post this.
    I am aware of Mandy Barren’s paper on the impact of Pteromalu puparum red admirals but not the other reference.

    I’ll do some research on Apanteles glomeratus/Cotesia glomerata, it would be great if a paper similar to Mandy’s was done to look at levels of impact on other species.

    #41443

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    Jaine, references regarding non-target parasitism by Pteromalus puparum:
    Butterflies of New Zealand – G.W. Gibbs
    Phenology and parasitism of the red admiral butterfly – Barron, Wratton, Barlow.

    Owing to a recent computer crash I am unable to pinpoint my reference to Apanteles glomeratus, but myself and another breeder have collected Nyctemera annulata larvae from the field and had a percentage of them produce cocoons which eclosed Cotesia wasps.

    #41417

    Jaine
    Participant

    Thanks Norm
    I appreciate that – can you please share the source of the information (it’s important for me to have all the facts)

    #41416

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    Apanteles glomeratus (syn. Cotesia glomerata) has been recorded to infect the native Magpie moth (Nyctemera annulata) and Pteromalus puparum, also introduced in the 1930’s to help control Pieris rapae, has also targeted both the Admirals and occasionally the Monarch.

    #41400

    Jaine
    Participant

    Thanks Norm and Jacqui
    Yes the social wasps were accidentally introduced. There were parasitoid wasps like Cotesia glomerate and Cotesia rubeleca introduced to control small cabbage white butterflies but these are not known to target non Pieris spp.

    Info on accidentally introduced wasps
    http://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/about-doc/concessions-and-permits/conservation-revealed/wasps-lowres.pdf

    and

    Info on Cotesia glomerata and Cotesia rubecula
    http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1603/0046-225X-31.2.367?mobileUi=0&

    #41392

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    A slight anomaly has crept in to the article, in that none of the four social wasps causing caterpillar (all species) mortality were introduced specifically, but rather found their own way into NZ. Because of the mild winters and lack of natural predators, plus an abundance of food sources, the wasps have become a major concern, particularly in the South Island forests where the Vespula wasps are competing with native birds for the honeydew food source.

    #41389

    Jacqui
    Moderator
    #41387

    TgaLiz
    Participant

    Saw this live – great story Jacquie! Your garden looks lovely and very butterfly friendly

    #41385

    Jacqui
    Moderator
Viewing 9 replies - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

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