Photography and Cameras

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  • #13642

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    This was a topic at your recent conference. Did you learn a lot about how to photograph insects?

    I’ve got the itch to blog a bit about insect photography and the features that are useful to have on a camera.

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  • #20655

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    It’s the wallpaper on my computer now

    #20647

    Swansong
    Participant

    Thanks Lepid for your comments and help on my 3 winged butterfly shot in the photo comments.

    #20585

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Sanyo licensed the eneloop technology to several other companies. As Eneloops are hard to get in NZ since Dick Smith stopped selling them I have mostly Vartas which are just as good.

    When you have a camera that takes 4 AAs and you have 3 sets then throwing them all away after only a year’s use, not nice at all (the first lot I had 4 years ago, the old type NiMHs, yech).

    Most of the close stuff I shoot now is macro instead of super macro, just crop it with Irfanview because super is not only hard to focus but there is that flash problem. This picture shows how hard it can be:
    http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/113XanCoyZay4kPMguxf5g?authkey=Gv1sRgCIHt4bjlip-O0wE&feat=directlink

    #20584

    Swansong
    Participant

    Yes I totally agree about the AA batteries which were another one of the ‘must haves’ for me, as I weighed up the pros and cons. No proprietry batteries for me. Mine takes 4 AAs and I even did HEAPS AND HEAPS of research on what type etc etc. A lot of my research was done here…

    http://www.dpreview.com/forums/

    As we all know things change very quickly in the technology field and what was so yesterday may not necessarily be so today. Going back 6 months or so, this was what I found…

    All over the boards the same old message came up and that was Eneloops Eneloops Eneloops. Even though they are 2100mAh as opposed to the higher powered 2400’s and above when all the sums are done, as you say the ready charged ones are the way to go. Down in my neck of the woods they were very difficult to get, but Ive now got my stash Hehee.

    I also did a lot of research on chargers and again one of the really popular choices was the Maha line . I got the 8 charger (MH-C801D) which has the ability to “condition” them by slow charging, among other things. You get a display as the batteries are charging so you can see if there’s anything funky going on. I keep quite a strict routine with my charging, as hubby and I have a number of gadgets that require them. Ive got 20 Eneloops, along with some other brands. They all seem to be doing well.

    Heh, youre not wrong about the flash and macro. The supermacro only works in manual, and Im hopefully starting to get a grip on some settings.

    But I most certainly am less than an amateur and hardly even begin to understand about lighting. This is just a basic observation that people have spoken about and that Ive found seems to be true. Not that I understand why. That site above has soOOOOooo much info you can easily spend hours there and wonder why you come out the other side with massive brain fade :-/.

    Cheers
    Swansong

    #20582

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Good choice for the SX10. I started with a Powershot S1 four years ago, upgraded last year to the S5. Picked the S1 for the articulating screen and especially the video performance, which at 640×480 is only a little below Mini-DV digital tape and is helped by the quiet ultrasonic lens motor.

    Most cameras have useful macro ranges, however for closeup shots a manual zoom is a must-have usually only found in more expensive digital compacts. The Canons have a super-macro (closer than 10 cm) which is OK as long as you don’t need to use flash because of lens shading.

    For all cameras using AA batteries, buy the “ready to use” type of NiMH rechargeable, which have much better capacity retention than earlier NiMHs, this translates to longer life and therefore cheaper cost, as well as convenience.

    The lighting issue is not one I really understand the technicalities of at this point in time, in the way you have written about it. Assuming you might be comparing ISO numbers, it is a fact that compacts tend to have lesser “ISO” performance than some high sensitivity films.

    #20579

    Swansong
    Participant

    Hi lepid,
    Having just of recent months acquired a digital Cam it took me a loooong time to decide on what suited me best. I really wanted something with a decent Macro and a decent optical zoom. My Canon SX10IS has 20X OPTICAL Zoom and Macro down to 0! I also wanted something that did reasonable movies and it has stereo sound! (Oooo Yeah I likee). This is obviously not a pro CAM but it has all the best features without going pro. Sorta 1/2 way inbetween. Im absolutely stoked with it and with care you can take some really nice piks. Lots of manual settings as well as fully auto.

    Digitals as opposed to analog apparently suffer tremendously in the area of lighting and are waaay less forgiving. Ive found this is a major especially for close up work. Im still very much learning. Theres been some times I have got it right and the close ups are staggeringly clear!

    Good topic 🙂
    Cheers
    Swansong

    #20577

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    George Gibbs did an interesting presentation, and we’re looking forward to having it on DVD – it’s coming. Will keep you informed.

    Would be glad to have posts here on the subject.

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