Jeannette

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  • in reply to: Unknown disease affecting my swan plants #61600

    Jeannette
    Participant

    I came across a website that recommended diluted hydrogen peroxide for black spot fungus. I’m going to try that because all my seedlings that have wintered over have it. Apparently, it comes from too much water which is unavoidable in Taranaki winter unless I brought them all inside which I don’t have room for.

    https://www.using-hydrogen-peroxide.com/gardening-with-hydrogen-peroxide.html

    in reply to: How do I take care of Monarchs in Winter? #61380

    Jeannette
    Participant

    I haven’t had butterflies in my garden for about a month and my garden is feeling and looking very “winter”, so last week I gathered my potted plants together and left them huddled for the winter expecting to transplant them to the garden closer to spring. Imagine my surprise and sense of perplexity to go out this morning to find a caterpillar on one of the plants! Since I saw the last butterfly, we have had two prolonged periods of heavy rain and strong winds, so the egg must have been on that plant for a long time. For its sheer tenacity – I have brought the whole plant inside for warmth to give this little cat a chance to be a butterfly. It survived as an egg in inhospitable weather and even as a cat – it’s not a tiny one – it has survived against the odds here in Taranaki – so I’ll help the odds a bit. It was immobile and I wasn’t sure it was even alive, but just a few minutes in the warmth and it is already moving and eating.

    in reply to: Thinking out loud: Ophryocystis elektroscirrha #61379

    Jeannette
    Participant

    what do you mean sterilise the eggs Jacqui?

    in reply to: Ophryocystis elektroscirrha #61284

    Jeannette
    Participant

    oh thank you so much. Very helpful. I will get some on my next outing. All the caterpillars are gone now so I will spray the plants next fine day without wind.

    in reply to: Nettles #61276

    Jeannette
    Participant

    Thanks for the Urtica australis seedlings you sent me Jacqui. They are all in the ground in my special ‘nettle patch’ and that safely out of reach. It is very cold here now that Taranaki has a dusting of snow – so I am wondering if while they are small I should put some sort of cover over them for the winter?
    The ongaonga which I planted last year I thought hadn’t made it, but when I pulled the weeks away, it is okay – hasn’t grown – but still alive so I am hopeful that the Admirals will find my garden next season. I saw a yellow admiral recently and was excited that it must have found my still small nettle patch – but then I learned that they have been recently released on the maunga – so that is encouraging.

    in reply to: Rain and waiting to release Monarch #61275

    Jeannette
    Participant

    I had the same thing with one of mine. She emerged and had enough time to pump up her wings but didn’t try to fly then the heavens opened so I used a marigold plant to encourage her onto a flower then brought the plant and her inside. She hung there for a couple of days, but when she tried to fly she fell. I put her back on the flower and another couple of days went by then suddenly she flew to the curtain and hung on. I walked over to her and suddenly to was off the curtain and on to my shoulder. The sky was clear so I walked outside and off she went – flying like she had been doing it all her life!

    in reply to: Not hatching #61274

    Jeannette
    Participant

    Thank you for that information. I have several black ones that have been that way for a while. To the compost.

    in reply to: Monarch Caterpillar – Wing Repair / Food #61273

    Jeannette
    Participant

    I have seen on other posts that any form of over-ripe fruit can be ‘eaten’ by the butterfly if the probiscus is working properly.
    I have repaired a few wings, but I have stopped doing that now as I read also in this forum somewhere that often it is a parasite that will cause deformity of the wing and if the butterfly is then given the abilty to fly (which it wouldn’t have naturally had) it will spread the parasite. I watched one “repaired” butterfly take off and it felt fabulous – but the next day I found it only 100 metres from where it took off from. It seemed to have just run out of energy and dropped dead. So I am not trying anymore to make butterflies fly that for some reason nature had prevented. I am instead just taking deep slow breaths and observing my own emotional reaction to assuming the butterfly-ego is as frustrated by not being able to fly as I would be! I still offer them help if they need it to get on to a flower where they can hang out like any other butterfly until life leaves them completely.

    in reply to: Monarch Caterpillars in winter #61272

    Jeannette
    Participant

    This is the first year that I have observed them clearly going comatose as it got colder. It was interesting to find some smaller ones arched as if about to take another bite but then just didn’t do it. I cut a couple of branches with them on and brought inside but it made no difference. One by one they died, so I didn’t bring anymore in. Now that I have plenty of food, I am taking a more “hands off observation” mode and allowing nature her brutal beauty as well as her delights.

    in reply to: Bringing chrysalis indoors??? #61270

    Jeannette
    Participant

    Thank you for all that information. I have brought some inside, and left others hanging outside. Some successes, and some that never emerged. For creating places to hang them, I bought one of those pool noodles and cut it into short lengths then split one side so it can be slid over a ledge, branch, broom stick, etc and then it is easy to pin the chrysalis in a hanging position. I had about 30 of them hanging in that way around the house and deck.

    in reply to: — ON LINE SEMINAR — #59138

    Jeannette
    Participant

    Hi Jacqui
    I’ve paid the $10 and emailed the proof of payment to the trademe address given, but I can’t find what time it is other than “morning”. Can you please let me know the time of the seminar and also the duration so I can block out my diary. Thanks
    Jeannette

    in reply to: Is Black Nightshade useful for anything? #58830

    Jeannette
    Participant

    ah ha! I had googled a lot and discovered that what I have is Black Nightshade not Deadly Nightshade which is not found in New Zealand. Amazed to find that it is actually edible given what I was told by my parents as a kid (who obviously thought is was deadly nightshade. Haven’t found anything on google about it being useful for butterflies or moths so I think I’ll just keep pulling it out but not be so concerned about it. It is not very attractive, but maybe I’ll keep a little plot somewhere just to see what happens if I let it go full cycle and will observe what sort of insects are attracted to it.

    in reply to: ironing crumpled wings #58538

    Jeannette
    Participant

    I just did it! I’m not sure that it will actually fly, but it certainly has a better chance. I found it flopping around on the ground and all four wings were quite bent so it wasn’t even walking properly. I started by doing what one person said – spit on my fingers and try to ease them out – too bent and hardened – so then I tried misting it will water and it didn’t like that at all and fluttered and tried to get away. I put a spoonful of watered down honey in front of it and it drank and drank for about 15 minutes. I then got brave and holding both wings together put it on a towel on its side – eased the wings as straight as they would go and then put a warmed (too hot to hold my finger on but not so hot that I couldn’t touch it – then put the iron on the wings being careful not to touch the body. It struggled with its legs but it was pinned. I let it up and there was an improvement so I did this three times. At that point only one underside wing edges were not responding so, having read that they can actually fly even without those underside wings, I just trimmed it back to where the bend was. It looked a lot better and could walk properly and was doing a lot of wing-stretching movements. I felt I had done everything I could and that it had a chance that it might fly now so I took it back out and put it on some flowers in the garden. I will check in the morning to see if it is still there. It had no chance before – I think it has a chance now. I feel more confident now that I have done it once that I could do it again. I had been out all day and it was on the ground in the sun so its wings had hardened but I probably would have gotten better results if I had found it earlier while the wings were still soft.

    So to be exact about it – I held both wings together and lay the butterfly on its side and placed the iron on both wings at once when they were as straight as they could be pinned under my fingers. The iron was at a temperature where I could get it close to my own fingers without it burning them so it could not burn the wings. I was extremely careful that the body could not touch the
    iron. At first I only held it down for about 15 seconds, but in the end I let it stay under the iron for about 45 seconds and that seemed to have the best result. It was quite badly crumpled on all wings so I feel more confident that it could really help the ones that are not quite so badly formed.

    in reply to: ironing crumpled wings #58529

    Jeannette
    Participant

    Thanks Kent. I am very interested to know if misting it would give it a chance to straighten – so long as they stay hanging upside down – I expect timing would be everything in terms of getting to it before the wings have hardened.

    in reply to: ironing crumpled wings #58495

    Jeannette
    Participant

    I presume you mean that they have no pain receptors in their wings – not that butterflies have no pain receptors. I would need to see some convincing evidence that their bodies so not have pain receptors. I was alarmed to read on the Facebook page that someone believes caterpillars do not have a nervous system! You only have to watch them quietly for a while to see that they are a nervous system! Butterflies respond to heat and cold, threats, visual environments – so they also have a nervous sytems. I personally do not euthanise butterflies that cannot fly. I shelter them for a while so they have time to adapt themselves to their situation, then let them be with the other butterflies in the garden and live out the lives that they have been given. But I pick butterflies up from predicaments if I find them – such as in a bucket of water with wings spread – or tangled in a cobweb – I will help them get on with their lives if I can. I just can’t quite understand the actual process of ironing a wing – I get that it has to be not too hot – but i don’t get how you get the butterfly into the right position and the wing in the right position to apply the iron. I do not want to experiment because I do not want to make things worse! We would also go to sleep and eventually die if someone put us in a freezer. That does not mean that it would be painless experience. Tissue gradually freezing is not going to be painless. Tissue is not made to freeze.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)